Iceland Travel Tips

Do the Dettifoss circle


Falling 45 m with a width of 100 m, Dettifoss is reputed to be the most powerful waterfall in Europe. Visitors generally approach Dettifoss on the east side of the River Jökulsá where the road through Hólssandur is better. However, there are plans to improve the road on the west side. Please take care whichever route you chose.

 

Dettifoss – west side

The grassy slopes on the western bank become extremely slippery when they are wet.

Dettifoss can be reached from the west side if you take route F862 in your Lava auto 4WD rental car. 

Road 862 is on the west side of Jökulsá river. The section between Ásbyrgi and Dettifoss is a gravel road, passable for all vehicles, but not served in winter. It usually opens late May or early June.

The section of road 862 between Dettifoss and road 1 is paved and passable for all vehicles. The road is not in service every day during the winter time and is often closed during snowy periods.

Before the river plunges down  the massive Dettifoss there are more beautiful waterfalls a bit higher and not to be missed.

Dettifoss – west side

Photo by messicanbeer

From Road 1 lies road 862 to Dettifoss, it’s an asphalt road so you can reach this area in any of our Lava Auto rental cars. But the rest of the route north and back on 864 requires one of our Lava Auto 4WD rental cars as the road is pretty rough in parts. If you are travelling during winter or early spring always check for warnings and road closures before setting off, either on www.road.is or by calling number 1777 for information.

 

Dettifoss – east side

Dettifoss – east side

Photo by Marco Nürnberger

Road 864 connects road 85 and road 1 past Dettifoss on the east side. This is a gravel road and driving time is dependent upon road conditions. Road 864 is closed during winter time due to snow or wet conditions (muddy road) and does not open until early summer (end of May).

On the eastern bank, the footpath down to the falls is very rough and a number of accidents have occurred when visitors have strayed from the track. On the eastern bank you can get as close as you want to the brutal power of water. Standing next to Dettifoss is an outstanding feeling.

Some years ago, plans were proposed to harness the hydroelectric potential of the canyon, but they were scrapped when the lava strata in the area were found to be too porous for a reservoir. 

 

Selfoss

Selfoss

Photo by ActiveSteve

Selfoss is a smaller waterfall a little way upstream with a drop of 10 m. There are easy paths from Dettifoss, which allow a pleasant 1 km walk.

Selfoss

Photo by ActiveSteve

 

The road less travelled

Take care on the rough dirt roads.

Take care on the rough dirt roads. Photo by ActiveSteve
 

Hafragilsfoss

Hafragilsfoss

Photo by Javier Rodríguez

Below Dettifoss, the Hafragilsfoss waterfall cascades 27 m into a deep canyon. It is best to drive to Hafragilsfoss, which is located in an environment that is geologically and historically as fascinating as Dettifoss.

On the east bank of the canyon, near Hafragilsfoss, the river has cut through a crater row named Randarhólar to expose a volcano's lava pipe in the cliff wall.

 

Hljóðaklettar

Hljóðaklettar

Photo by Sveinn S. Erlendsson

Hljóðaklettar, or Echo Rocks if we translate the name, are the remains of ancient volcanoes which have been heavily eroded by the Jökulsá river, leaving only the volcanic plugs behind. It is interesting to listen to the cliff acoustic near the river and walk between the unique geological phenomena: basalt columns in various shapes, cliffs, honeycomb weathering and caves. A little further to the north stand Rauðhólar, the original scoria cones.

There is a short easy trail from the parking area down to Hljóðaklettar. The first rock is one of the few rocks in Hljóðaklettar which has a specific name, Tröllið or The Troll. If you follow the path a couple of meters east from Tröllið, to the right, and walk over a slightly rocky trail you can see beautiful basalt columns and honey comb weathering. The same path is followed back to the parking area.

And if you have the time there are longer trails to hike in the area.

 

Ásbyrgi

Ásbyrgi

Photo by Javier Rodríguez

Ásbyrgi is one of the wonders of nature, a wide, horseshoe-shaped canyon with sheer cliff faces up to 100 m high. It is 3.5 km long and over 1 km wide. At its innermost end lies a small pond surrounded by luxuriant vegetation called Botnstjörn. A distinctive rock formation rises up from the center of Ásbyrgi, up to 250 m wide, known as Eyjan or the island.

Ásbyrgi was formed by two or more catastrophic floods caused by glacial bursts from the northern part of the Vatnajökull ice cap, one between eight and ten thousand years ago and a second approximately three thousand years ago. Since then the bed of the river has moved eastwards.

According to legend Ásbyrgi was formed when Sleipnir, the Norse god Odin's eight-legged horse, put one of his hooves down as the god rode by.

Odinn riding the eight legged horse Sleipnir

Drawing from 1880 by Ludwig Berger

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